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Creepy, creepy seaweed
While dulse looks like reddish-purple ribbons, there's a seaweed whose tubular branches resemble swollen fingers of a human. It is known as dead man's fingers. So when this seaweed hangs down the side of a rock, you might feel that someone is beneath that rock with his fingers sticking out!
Atlantic dulse
A popular snack food in Ireland, Iceland, and the United States, to name a few, dulse is one of nature's nutritionally dense foods. The noteworthy aspect of dulse, an edible red algae, is its protein content, which is higher than most other vegetables. Munching on dulse can do wonders for your health.
Is bursting with protein
Woman with tray of seaweed
Vegetarians have a difficult time meeting their daily protein requirement because when it comes to this nutrient, vegetables are way behind animal sources. Dulse, however, packs plenty of punch in a high-protein diet for vegetarians. Scientists have found that the protein content in this seaweed is the highest in winter-spring period and lowest in summer-early autumn.
Is a super source of fiber
Woman having stomachache
Constipation is one of the most common stomach problems that affect people of all ages. But people whose diet includes a regular dose of dulse don't have to worry about that. This seaweed is packed with dietary fiber. In fact, it adds more fiber to your diet than oat bran. And as you know, adequate intake of fiber a day keeps most stomach problems at bay. And this is not all, fiber is also a potent weapon against cholesterol. So there you have it; a healthy stomach and a healthy heart are what you get when you bring home dulse.
Is good for your beating heart
Heartbeat
Guess what makes your heart beat? Yes, romance may be an answer, but on a cellular level it is the mineral potassium. On an average, your heart beats 100,000 times a day. And in all this work, potassium plays a key role. It works as an electrolyte that helps relay nerve impulses between the central nervous system and the rest of the body. So cutting the long story short, dulse is loaded with potassium.
Is the "Iron Man" of seaweeds
Dulse tops all sea vegetables when it comes to iron - a mineral that enables red blood cells to carry oxygen from the lungs to rest of the body. So for people with iron-deficiency, eating dulse should be a no-brainer. Furthermore, iron is also necessary for healthy skin, cells, and nails.
Also gives iodine
Iodine deficiency causes goiter and hypothyroidism apart from other problems. And to prevent this deficiency, we have iodized salt. But there are people whose diet restricts salt intake. This is where the iodine rich dulse emerges as a star. This seaweed is not only high in iodine, but low in sodium than most of its kind.
Has magnesium and manganese too
Why is magnesium an essential mineral for the human body? Well, given its key role in about 300 different biochemical reactions, I don't see any reason why it shouldn't be! And speaking of manganese (not to be confused with magnesium), one of its main functions is facilitating the metabolic process. It is also important for the body to absorb and utilize iodine. And guess what, dulse is abundant in both these trace minerals important for the body.
Dulse is also rich in
Vitamin a
  • Vitamin A
Vitamin b
  • B vitamins (B1, B2, B6, B12)
Vitamin c
  • Vitamin C
Vitamin e
  • Vitamin E
  • Calcium
zinc word
  • Zinc
  • Phosphorus
  • Chromium
Antioxidants in Dulse
Immune system
As if accommodating nutrients like fiber, protein, iron, potassium, iodine, vitamins, and essential minerals wasn't enough, dulse also has room for antioxidant agents. Clinical studies show that the antioxidant properties of this seaweed help build and maintain a healthy immune system. And when we say healthy immune system, we mean less risks of developing conditions like multiple sclerosis, arthritis, lupus, Graves' disease, and other autoimmune problems.
Considering all the benefits that dulse has to offer, I am certain that you have all the reasons to include this seaweed in your daily diet. Take care!