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Whenever I see an apron, it reminds me of the retro movies and TV shows, wherein the women, clad in pretty aprons, used to look nice and the food used to look great. Here is a glimpse of the nostalgic vintage aprons donned by the women of yesteryear.
Vintage Apron Styles That Were ...
Aprons have played an enormously important role over a span of 1000 years, before becoming a symbol of housewives in the 1950s. The emergence of aprons goes back to the 10th century after which, by the 13th century, blacksmiths donned them. At around the 17th century, maids started wearing aprons to keep their dresses neat and clean. Aprons were simpler to stitch and wash, as well as helped the housemaids to handle hot fire tools. Furthermore, in the 50s and 60s, TV actresses (specifically TV moms), started making use of these aprons which heightened their popularity. Aprons became a fashionable style statement in every household. But with time, at around the 20th century, the charm of aprons receded.
Apron Styles ... Reminiscent of the Past
Apron Styles ... Reminiscent of the Past
Aprons have come a long way, from being a simple garment to a protective one, and are now being used by modern women as an important accessory. Today, aprons are more of a lifestyle choice than a requirement. Be that as it may, vintage apron patterns are still welcome. So, let's start with some easy retro patterns of aprons.
Vintage Kitchen Aprons
Vintage Kitchen Aprons
Vintage aprons have a charm of their own whether you are new to wearing an apron or an apron buff. Vintage aprons represent a calm and domesticated woman of the past, so why not find out how to stitch one for yourself?

• To sew a vintage apron, you'll need at least 1-1.5 yards of pre-washed and ironed cotton cloth (preferably white for that vintage look).
• Cut the fabric so that it is wide enough to cover your sides and chest. Now you need to cut it so that it looks like an apron.
• For covering the top portion (chest area) of your apron, you need to measure the distance across the chest. Divide this measurement into half and add 2.5 inches to it.
• Fold the fabric into half, measure from the fold to the distance in step 3 and mark it.
• Decide from where to where the top portion of the apron till the waist should be. Take a measurement of this on the fabric opposite to the fold and mark it.
• Between the two markings you've done, cut a curved line for your apron. Hem the edges of the apron from all sides by folding them over.
• Fold the curved edges of the apron on the wrong side a bit to make the casing for the ties.

If you want a colorful vintage pattern, use a printed fabric for a striking look.
Dish Towel Aprons
Dish Towel Aprons
This is my personal favorite retro apron pattern. It is an apron made of a dish towel. It is great for the fact that it is amazingly water absorbent. Let's figure out how to make your own dish cloth apron.

• First, take a dish towel.
• Run a needle and thread in and out. Keep it even and very close to the trim. Then, draw it to the tightness of gathering of your choice.
Then, pin 20" ribbons in place and sew over the gathering. Make sure that the wrinkle is under the needle and the fabric is not flattening out.
• Next, measure 2 ribbons 28" inches long, also measure, where at your waist you wish to tie the apron. Pin them into place, along the back right and left edges of the towel and sew just over the ribbon, along the original towel seam.

There you go; your cute retro apron is ready!
Denim Aprons
Denim Aprons
This is a very 'cool' retro apron pattern. Denims are great for aprons too, so in this one, we use denim. You could use one of your old jeans (this is the best alibi to get rid of the jeans that you don't fit into!).

• First, take a pair of jeans, measure the length that you want for your apron. Cut the jeans in that length, but from the bottom-up.
• Then, cut the inside seam and open the pant leg out.
• Cut the top of the apron with the width you want.
Waist Aprons
Waist Aprons
This apron pattern is too cute for me to resist. This apron is half sized, i.e., from waist down.

• Take any floral-patterned fabric in a rectangular shape. Keep the length and width as per your size (you could use the front side of an old skirt, too).
• Next, take a smaller, square-shaped fabric of (preferably) a contrasting shade and stitch it on the apron center as a pocket.
• Next, make the edges neat. You could do this by putting edging tapes or by sewing it in a sewing machine.
These were a few of my favorite retro apron patterns. They are simple to make and look vintage, yet trendy. Let us not forget, they make you feel great while cooking. If you come across more great patterns, feel free to share it!